Live 'Story telling' event

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This event has concluded

You can read a summary of the event, participant feedback and the lessons we learnt in the Event Summary tab below.

Background

In these uncertain times and the recent restrictions to support social distancing, we have had numerous requests of how our EngagementHQ digital tools can be used to replace or mimic face-to-face engagement events.

While many are familiar with how you can use our eight digital engagement tools, there are many ways these tools can be used to support and increase online engagement, or to be used to host an 'online event'.

Feature Tool

This live event will focus on EngagementHQ's Stories Tool.

Empathising with your community is essential for understanding the "lived" experience in relation to an issue or event. This tool allows people to share rich-media including videos and images. It also allows the contributor to receive comments on their contribution and there is also a sentiment tracking feature where people can like or dislike these comments. This tool is used best when it's part of a design thinking methodology, to truly understand your community's needs and desires.

In this event, we're asking you all to share your stories of how a single moment or key development(s) shifted the focus or approach of an engagement project.

When

Wednesday 22 April at 11.30am (AEST – that's Victoria time).

Details

Stage one

11.30am: Sign up.

11.35am: Take the Quick Poll

Have you had to change your engagement methodology during a consultation?

Stage two

11.45am–12.30pm: Tell us your story using the Stories Tool

Share your stories of how a single moment or key development(s) shifted the focus or approach of an engagement project. We're accepting stories until Wednesday 22 April, 5pm. Please refresh your screen regularly to see other people's stories.

Stage three

We will look further into the data using EngagementHQ's tagging and sentiment analysis features and report back on the key findings on Thursday 23 April (via the Newsfeed Tool).

This event has concluded

You can read a summary of the event, participant feedback and the lessons we learnt in the Event Summary tab below.

Background

In these uncertain times and the recent restrictions to support social distancing, we have had numerous requests of how our EngagementHQ digital tools can be used to replace or mimic face-to-face engagement events.

While many are familiar with how you can use our eight digital engagement tools, there are many ways these tools can be used to support and increase online engagement, or to be used to host an 'online event'.

Feature Tool

This live event will focus on EngagementHQ's Stories Tool.

Empathising with your community is essential for understanding the "lived" experience in relation to an issue or event. This tool allows people to share rich-media including videos and images. It also allows the contributor to receive comments on their contribution and there is also a sentiment tracking feature where people can like or dislike these comments. This tool is used best when it's part of a design thinking methodology, to truly understand your community's needs and desires.

In this event, we're asking you all to share your stories of how a single moment or key development(s) shifted the focus or approach of an engagement project.

When

Wednesday 22 April at 11.30am (AEST – that's Victoria time).

Details

Stage one

11.30am: Sign up.

11.35am: Take the Quick Poll

Have you had to change your engagement methodology during a consultation?

Stage two

11.45am–12.30pm: Tell us your story using the Stories Tool

Share your stories of how a single moment or key development(s) shifted the focus or approach of an engagement project. We're accepting stories until Wednesday 22 April, 5pm. Please refresh your screen regularly to see other people's stories.

Stage three

We will look further into the data using EngagementHQ's tagging and sentiment analysis features and report back on the key findings on Thursday 23 April (via the Newsfeed Tool).

Adaptability is key to a successful engagement project

One of the key themes of our live events is the importance of being adaptable in our ever-changing world. This skill must also be transferred to your public engagement planning. It’s good to have a well-thought-out engagement project plan, however your organisation should be prepared to change the approach to your engagement project.

Share your stories about how a single moment or key development(s) shifted your approach during an engagement project. 

Tell us why you had to adapt your engagement plan and how you did it.



Thank you for sharing your story with us.

You need to be signed in to share your story.

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    Death threats and animal carcass

    by Audrey, 3 months ago

    One of the first projects I worked on in Local Government was consolidating local laws after amalgamations.

    Challenge:

    • Three local laws needed to be merged into one
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    • There was a distrust and resistance to being forced into a local government that some areas did not want to be part of.
    • The local law we were changing impacted people's businesses.
    • This was the first of many local laws to seek the communities engagement.
    • Council was yet to implement an... Continue reading

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    "Urban Camping" - engaging in short timeframes

    3 months ago

    I come from a community open space and event management background so my story of adaptation is tilted towards this - the story below was working in public land open space management.

    Ordinarily our community event engagement and approval process for public land use for a major event involves months of meetings, teleconferences and various stakeholder interactions and engagement tools including surveys, brainstorming and site map drafting - back and forth to reach agreement. We had existing very strict timelines and documentation to support this process.

    In this instance a non-for-profit community group had marketed a large event in a... Continue reading

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    Ambushed by angry residents

    3 months ago

    One of the very first engagement projects that I ever ran involved building a new War Memorial Garden in a local park. I wrote up an engagement plan, promoted it to key stakeholders and local residents and invited them to the park so I could take them on a short walking tour and physically show them the proposed design. Following this event we would then welcome any feedback on the draft design and the engagement period would officially commence.

    However during the initial investigation and planning phase, I was told about an existing issue that local residents were really annoyed... Continue reading

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    Can it really end like that? What do we need to do?

    3 months ago

    As an external consultant planning for your engagements is often done somewhat in a bubble, with limited information and access to stakeholders, before you are awarded a contract or allowed into the project.

    There was a significant project with mixed enterprise farmers (livestock and graizing) that was undertaking an impact of a grants scheme (behaviour change prorgam) to determine the uptake and ongoing uptake of the practice.

    Initial planning was all based on a belief that the organisation had strong ties within the community and could provide a database of farmers that included both those that had and had not... Continue reading